Prior to joining The Nation of Islam, I voiced what I wanted for my life and I had an exhausting list of questions that were hard to find answers for. So when I attended my first lecture on Sunday, January 12, 2014, it was shocking to see and hear some of what I wanted for my life and to receive answers to questions I had for years. It only took one meeting to plant seeds in the womb of my mind and heart. No, I wasn’t sure about joining just yet, but I knew I wanted more. It was a lot to process. Could this all be too good to be true?

Following a couple of weeks, I decided to take a trip to the mosque. This time I attended my first processing M.G.T. & G.C.C., Muslim Girls in Training & General Civilization Class on Saturday, January 25, 2014 and returned to the Sunday meeting on January 26 to hear Sister Ava Muhammad. It was nice to see and hear a Black woman speak so freely on what she believed in, in such a civilized and confident way. The spirit and the manner in which she delivered the message resulted in me joining The Nation of Islam and I have not looked back since. From there, I worked hard to understand the prerequisites of The Teachings of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Later that year, I became a registered member of The Nation of Islam on September 20, 2014.

After eighth grade, I was moving to a mindset that no longer wanted to be in the close company of women. There were girls who backstabbed me and I felt as if I could no longer trust women, but I knew it wasn’t best to take men as “close” friends either. I knew that there was power in women coming together, but I wasn’t sure if that was possible for my life. Being in the processing class opened my eyes to a powerful sisterhood. The way I observed the processing instructors, it made me see the beauty in women collaborating and being one united front. My work as an empowerment coach now meant so much more then just some thing I was doing. Listen to the full interview here.

So when I walked into the registered M.G.T. Class, I was very grateful for being chosen by Allah to be considered as His girl who is being refined. Not only am I becoming a better individual, I am collectively aiding in the betterment of the condition of this world. The world will not improve, until the woman is uplifted. A nation can rise no higher than its woman, so if I’m not being elevated, I understand that it’s best to remove myself from potentially detrimental situations. I am the standard. We the M.G.T. are the standard and Insha’Allah (God Willing), we will be pleasing to The Most High.

StudentBeing the standard is easy to say, but it’s not easy to grasp what this means in totality. If we are truly the standard, which we are, then this implies that there’s a lot of work that must be done. 75% of work is with the woman. As much as I can recall, the woman has always been on the frontline working, alongside the man and without the man. Being the Second Self of Allah (God), we make no excuses. We work even when we’re tired and through the pain. This work requires an ongoing study. Can a woman who does not study say that she is fulfilling God’s Will? I know an M.G.T. cannot. In the very title is a reminder that we must train and be in class. So to be an M.G.T., we must humble ourselves to always be a student. I am always thankful to say and show that I am a student of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad under the divine guidance of The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan.

I am thankful to The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan for standing firm in his Islam and in The Mission to resurrect the dead. Had it not been for The Minister, I would not know about The Nation of Islam or our true history that is not shared in this world’s educational system. Most of all, The Minister has helped me embrace who I am, all of me, the duality of me that most could not stand to receive a glimpse of. One of the many of gifts that he’s given is Self-Improvement: The Basis for Community Development study guides, which has been a tremendous aid. Throughout his stand as the representative of his teacher, The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad, he has reminded us of the importance of resurrection (killing the devil and raising the god within). No matter how much I tried to improve myself elsewhere, I was also searching for more because I was never feeding from The Source. It is The Teachings that have allowed me to continue becoming who I am supposed to be. I can never thank this beautiful man, who has sacrificed himself for humanity. Referring to him as a humble man is the least.

As my personal testimony, I must share that The Minister’s profound statement, “Pain is the mother of creativity” is one that has helped me most. Accepting Allah (God) and declaring to Him that I want to serve in The Mission of raising the dead is not easy, especially when the first dead that has to rise is you. And then after you’ve been raised, while you’re bringing more home, there is always more work to be done with the person in the mirror. Raising the dead in us is an ongoing task. It’s one that I don’t want to stop and wouldn’t have the option to opt-out of, if I wanted. As I’m continuing to learn that self-improvement is painful, I’m also learning that it’s purifying. Trials are purifying and just as painful as it is to become one with Allah, it’s just as ugly to look at others in their pain sometimes. I’m not sorry for saying that. I’m keeping it real. We can all be some ugly people. I’m learning that just as ugly as I can be in my healing process, others around me are just as ugly. This understanding is helping me be more forgiving to myself and anyone that has possibly caused me an ounce of pain. The reality is that we cause pain on ourselves more than we like to point the finger. People are not perfect and this includes the people who follow Allah (God). Islam is perfect though. Islam is the be all. Look at the word, “ISlam”. It’s like BElam. Okay, I’m corny, but I hope you see the point I’m making.

Overall in life, which Islam is a way of life, we are constantly being tried because everyday there is a test to pass/past (excel in and move forward). I used to hate test, especially pop quizzes. Now, my goal is to take the test and take my time through it. I’m in no rush. I am in the class of God and I have a lot to learn about Him and myself. Instead of asking “why me” or “why this test required”, I am thanking Allah that He still sees me as worthy and I am continuing to purify my heart, so that my mind can be prepared and so that my actions align with my mental and spiritual being. My Islam is transforming and I understand that this is an ongoing process for me and those surrounding me, so I’m covered with Allah’s armor, so that I can put forth my all.

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