My Journey in Islam is Transforming

Prior to joining The Nation of Islam, I voiced what I wanted for my life and I had an exhausting list of questions that were hard to find answers for. So when I attended my first lecture on Sunday, January 12, 2014, it was shocking to see and hear some of what I wanted for my life and to receive answers to questions I had for years. It only took one meeting to plant seeds in the womb of my mind and heart. No, I wasn’t sure about joining just yet, but I knew I wanted more. It was a lot to process. Could this all be too good to be true?

Following a couple of weeks, I decided to take a trip to the mosque. This time I attended my first processing M.G.T. & G.C.C., Muslim Girls in Training & General Civilization Class on Saturday, January 25, 2014 and returned to the Sunday meeting on January 26 to hear Sister Ava Muhammad. It was nice to see and hear a Black woman speak so freely on what she believed in, in such a civilized and confident way. The spirit and the manner in which she delivered the message resulted in me joining The Nation of Islam and I have not looked back since. From there, I worked hard to understand the prerequisites of The Teachings of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Later that year, I became a registered member of The Nation of Islam on September 20, 2014.

After eighth grade, I was moving to a mindset that no longer wanted to be in the close company of women. There were girls who backstabbed me and I felt as if I could no longer trust women, but I knew it wasn’t best to take men as “close” friends either. I knew that there was power in women coming together, but I wasn’t sure if that was possible for my life. Being in the processing class opened my eyes to a powerful sisterhood. The way I observed the processing instructors, it made me see the beauty in women collaborating and being one united front. My work as an empowerment coach now meant so much more then just some thing I was doing. Listen to the full interview here.

So when I walked into the registered M.G.T. Class, I was very grateful for being chosen by Allah to be considered as His girl who is being refined. Not only am I becoming a better individual, I am collectively aiding in the betterment of the condition of this world. The world will not improve, until the woman is uplifted. A nation can rise no higher than its woman, so if I’m not being elevated, I understand that it’s best to remove myself from potentially detrimental situations. I am the standard. We the M.G.T. are the standard and Insha’Allah (God Willing), we will be pleasing to The Most High.

StudentBeing the standard is easy to say, but it’s not easy to grasp what this means in totality. If we are truly the standard, which we are, then this implies that there’s a lot of work that must be done. 75% of work is with the woman. As much as I can recall, the woman has always been on the frontline working, alongside the man and without the man. Being the Second Self of Allah (God), we make no excuses. We work even when we’re tired and through the pain. This work requires an ongoing study. Can a woman who does not study say that she is fulfilling God’s Will? I know an M.G.T. cannot. In the very title is a reminder that we must train and be in class. So to be an M.G.T., we must humble ourselves to always be a student. I am always thankful to say and show that I am a student of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad under the divine guidance of The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan.

I am thankful to The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan for standing firm in his Islam and in The Mission to resurrect the dead. Had it not been for The Minister, I would not know about The Nation of Islam or our true history that is not shared in this world’s educational system. Most of all, The Minister has helped me embrace who I am, all of me, the duality of me that most could not stand to receive a glimpse of. One of the many of gifts that he’s given is Self-Improvement: The Basis for Community Development study guides, which has been a tremendous aid. Throughout his stand as the representative of his teacher, The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad, he has reminded us of the importance of resurrection (killing the devil and raising the god within). No matter how much I tried to improve myself elsewhere, I was also searching for more because I was never feeding from The Source. It is The Teachings that have allowed me to continue becoming who I am supposed to be. I can never thank this beautiful man, who has sacrificed himself for humanity. Referring to him as a humble man is the least.

As my personal testimony, I must share that The Minister’s profound statement, “Pain is the mother of creativity” is one that has helped me most. Accepting Allah (God) and declaring to Him that I want to serve in The Mission of raising the dead is not easy, especially when the first dead that has to rise is you. And then after you’ve been raised, while you’re bringing more home, there is always more work to be done with the person in the mirror. Raising the dead in us is an ongoing task. It’s one that I don’t want to stop and wouldn’t have the option to opt-out of, if I wanted. As I’m continuing to learn that self-improvement is painful, I’m also learning that it’s purifying. Trials are purifying and just as painful as it is to become one with Allah, it’s just as ugly to look at others in their pain sometimes. I’m not sorry for saying that. I’m keeping it real. We can all be some ugly people. I’m learning that just as ugly as I can be in my healing process, others around me are just as ugly. This understanding is helping me be more forgiving to myself and anyone that has possibly caused me an ounce of pain. The reality is that we cause pain on ourselves more than we like to point the finger. People are not perfect and this includes the people who follow Allah (God). Islam is perfect though. Islam is the be all. Look at the word, “ISlam”. It’s like BElam. Okay, I’m corny, but I hope you see the point I’m making.

Overall in life, which Islam is a way of life, we are constantly being tried because everyday there is a test to pass/past (excel in and move forward). I used to hate test, especially pop quizzes. Now, my goal is to take the test and take my time through it. I’m in no rush. I am in the class of God and I have a lot to learn about Him and myself. Instead of asking “why me” or “why this test required”, I am thanking Allah that He still sees me as worthy and I am continuing to purify my heart, so that my mind can be prepared and so that my actions align with my mental and spiritual being. My Islam is transforming and I understand that this is an ongoing process for me and those surrounding me, so I’m covered with Allah’s armor, so that I can put forth my all.

I Am Covered Through Trials

I was blessed to be born and raised in The Nation of Islam with a personal decision to officially register in 2014. I joined because I saw no other way of life worthy to accept. None proved to be a path I belonged to.

The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan is the literal reason I was born, for if he had not penetrated the minds of my parents with the truth of Allah (God), then they would not have married and conceived me. He is the ultimate example of a human becoming a god, just as Jesus 2,000 years ago said we were! What hasn’t he done for me?

John 10:34 Jesus answered them, is it not written in your law, I said, ye are gods?

As a registered member of The Nation of Islam, I have the opportunity to strive towards perfection and ultimate godhood in the M.G.T. & G.C.C., Muslim Girls in Training & General Civilization Class. However, it is a challenge to be in this world and not succumb to being of this world. I have stumbled plenty of times, but what helps me be steadfast is the protection of the sisterhood. The sisterhood is the equivalent of God’s covering (the “hood”).

Through everything, I know I have Allah and my sisters to make it through. Islam is trying in a world that does not approve, but I’m not done giving my all for freedom.

Allah’s love for His girl, Sister Terrika Muhammad

I am a “Nation Baby” so I was raised in the Nation, but I did still choose Islam for myself. Because we are a curious people with free will, we all have that period of time where we wander from the religious beliefs that we were raised knowing. That lasted approximately six months for me. I realized quickly that I belong in The Nation.

img_0241-2I started hanging with my college friends, you know, living the “college life” and Allah (God) always showed me that I didn’t belong. I had a death experience at least twice. One, an associate was under the influence, and almost drove us off the road. The people around me all thought this situation was funny, but I knew, Allah’s goal was to snatch me back in. I was even put on probation from college being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Thankfully, I completed secondary education with a Bachelors of Science and am currently in the field of technology in accordance with my studies. Then, I was completely oblivious to where I was in that moment. The song that I relate to, that literally had me in tears was Crawl by Chris Brown. I had to crawl my way back to The Nation, to Allah. Quickly!

He gave the human being something that He never gave any of His creatures. He gave us the free will to choose and then He offers us the right way. But He lets us choose if we wish to follow His Way.
– The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, A Prescription for Humanity (article)

The Nation of Islam set me apart from the people I was around in public. I was taught things that the world could never teach me. I was taught that cleanliness was next to godliness and that I could literally become God! I am the Second Self of God. What an honor that is! If all women knew that, we would carry ourselves better and move like we were on top on the world. Because we literally are. We build nations. I wouldn’t have learned these things had it not been for Master Fard Muhammad, The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad and The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan. I love them for their sacrifice and for saving my life.

The Nation of Islam showed me how special I was from a young age and helped me to see my true value. Being an M.G.T., Muslim Girl in Training gives me that okay to still be a little girl in Allah’s eyes, while still evolving to be the best woman that I can be. One who is always willing to learn more from God and His servants.

Matthew 18:3 “Assuredly, I say to you, unless you are converted and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven.

God’s servant in our midst, The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan has given me life! I think life should include fulfillment, purpose, honor, humbleness. Minister Louis Farrakhan has taught me how to achieve all of that, plus more! I have a life with untapped value that I am still learning how to discover from The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan.

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As I’m continuing to discover my value, I see the importance of dressing modest, which brings up a challenge that comes with being a Muslimah: what do I wear?! Especially in the summer. Almost every store wants for you to conform and show some kind of skin! I am overcoming it by getting my own clothes made. Sometimes we have to go the extra mile for things we love. My Islam is love.

Sister Fatimah: The Revolutionary

I was born in the Nation of Islam, but I accepted for myself and officially registered approximately two and a half years ago. As a registered member, I am a part of the M.G.T. & G.C.C., Muslims Girls in Training & General Civilization Class.

In short, M.G.T. to me means being willing to be shaped into the model of the new woman that comes out of the mind of our Saviour, Master Fard Muhammad.

There are many challenges that I face being a Muslimah, but my number one challenge in this journey is getting other women to understand that we are by no means oppressed. This is a spiritual path that we chose after all else had failed us.

Islam comes after everything else fails.
– The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad, Everything Has Failed (article, republished from Message To The Blackman)

Sometimes I feel ostracized by others (not necessarily in my sister circle) because they see Muslimahs as weak. They don’t understand our expression of womanhood, so they judge us. Fighting hard to be righteous in this world is strength and Islam has allowed me and many others to freely express our femininity at the highest level. I want others to see the freedom in Islam.

The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan has done so much for me that I can’t thank Allah enough. I would say the most paramount thing is helping me to discover and understand my intrinsic nature. His guidance has enabled me to see deeper into self and realize my value as a co-creater with God, not just physically, but spiritually. No other teacher or preacher of religion on this planet is elevating the black woman in America and really all women over the world.

He has encouraged me to remain steadfast in this journey of self-development so that Allah may use me to be an example for my daughter and other girls/women. The knowledge of self and of Allah can absolutely transform our lives!

There may be many challenges that I face, but it is my Islam that is making me stronger. My Islam is revolutionary. As long as I have Allah, I am a force and will continue to stand in the fight to serve as a vessel who is contributing toward bringing in the new world.

Sister Sharanda Died Three Times to Live

Prior to joining The Nation of Islam, I’d been having visions into future experiences. I am and always am destined to be spiritually inclined. I believed in a higher being or divinity, however I believe in The All. As a spiritual teacher, Jesus left principles that are worth adhering to. I understand when they ask Jesus how do you pray, he answered you pray unto the father. I pray only to The Creator, my sustenance comes through The All.

You are not taught to pray to be heard by Moses and other prophets, not even Elijah whom they say went to Heaven whole soul and body. If Elijah cannot hear a prayer and he was not killed as Jesus was, then how can Jesus hear a prayer? We must not pray to dead prophets. They can’t hear our prayers.
The Muslim loves all of Allah’s prophets, but we will not pray for life to come to us from a dead prophet; not even to Muhammad who lived nearly 1,400 years ago. We pray in the name of Allah and mention the name of His last prophet in our prayer as an honor and thanks to Allah for His last guide to us.
– The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad, Day of Resurrection of Dead So-Called Negroes Has Arrived (Reprint from Our Saviour Has Arrived)

The vision before I accepted was of my death 3 times. Did I die? In the last one, I cried out to Jesus and in the vision I said no “Allah”. I awoke confused of this vision, but it brought about an intense craving to read and learn. Thus, for months I did nothing but read all of the books I could find. I did not sleep – my family a woke and slept and each time they found me reading.

“When he is [you are] taught the spirit of truth, He will guide you into all truth.”
– The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, The Crucifixion of Jesus

Next, I went through tremors and shaking when something moved me to my core, as confirmation that I was receiving truth. To say this is Divine intervention is correct. So much synchronicity happened in my life; it initially started when I came to America. I was meant to be here – Destiny would have it no other way.

The power of thought, as manifested through the Law of Synchronicity and The Theology of Time, projects all things coming to pass in the appropriate moment and place.
– Mother Tynetta Muhammad, A Picture is Worth a Thousands Words (article)

An MGT in The Nation of Islam is a woman knowing and accepting that all possibilities are open for me, I can accomplish what I will. That I am my own ruler. I design my fate according to my actions and deeds and first and foremost to do no harm. It means to me that I have accepted peace from within myself, from Allah no force can break. It means to me that the oneness of Allah is all I need.

Allah is sufficient for me—there is no God but He. On Him do I rely, and He is the Lord of the mighty Throne. (Holy Qur’an 9:128-129)

Being in The Nation of Islam, I am blessed to say I have not come across many challenges. My family at first questioned why, but let it go, because of love and tolerance for each other. Friends have not questioned my faith. One went as far as saying, I knew your spiritual path would take you where you wanted to be. She said and I quote:

“You are an all or nothing type of person.”

I may have died three times in a vision, but it saved me. Islam is Life.


Interested in knowing some of the books I read during this time:

  • At the beginning, I was guided to Psalm and completed this Book in The Bible.
  • I read Hermès Trice The Great twice
  • Dare to Believe by Mary Rowland
  • The Secret of Freemasonry by Elijah Muhammad
  • The Secret to Perfect Living by James Mangan
  • The Holy Qur’an
  • Study Guide 19: by The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan
  • The God Tribe of Shabazz
  • The Genesis Years (unpublished and rare writing)
  • The Motherplane by The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad
  • The Book of Enoch
  • Books on Aristotle, Plato, and Osho

Muslim Women’s Day: Sisters in The Nation of Islam

ProfessionallyI’m in marketing and was offended when a story in the pipeline for Muslim Women’s Day got delayed because “it’s not a widely-known holiday”. Because I’m taught to rise above emotions into the thinking of God, I realized that it is my responsibility to spread the Good News and represent as a Muslim woman. I don’t need to wait on anyone or expect anyone else to do the work. I will say, I am happy my job will share a story on a Muslim woman. It’s just that comment was an ouch that I turned into an opportunity.

Documented Journey covered eight stories of eight beautiful sisters who are embracing their Islam. Sit back in your chair and join us on our journeys.

* My Journey in Islam is TransformingSister Zakiyyah Maryam’s Islam is ResilientAllah’s love for His girl, Sister Terrika MuhammadI Am Covered Through TrialsSister Fatimah: The RevolutionaryWearing a garment is naturally beautifulSister Sharanda Died Three Times to LiveWho and what is your reflection?


Thank you for visiting Documented Journey.

Wearing a garment is naturally beautiful.

On a typical moment of scrolling on Facebook, I smiled when I noticed a Sister expressing her love for wearing a garment. In my elation, I had to stop and read her post. In it she was sharing how thankful she was to have and wear a garment that is instructed for Sisters who are registered members in The Nation of Islam (NOI) under The Teachings of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad.Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 11.02.28 AM


I truly love being in my garment, so when I see the same appreciation in other Sisters, it just makes me smile inside. To know that Sisters feel comfortable and that they’re being their true selves, while being completely covered. Most of all, the garment is a sign of obedience – it’s pleasing to Allah (God).

Sister Tanzania says, “People wear clothing to express themselves to show their sense of fashion. Wearing a garment isn’t something a lot of women are willing to do. Being in a wicked society, tight and revealing clothes is the trend.”

Is tight and revealing clothing the trend? 

I beg your pardon. I think not. I agree with Sister Tanzania – being of this world will make us think that our undergarments are permissible to wear. Tights and leggings have become the new pants. Undergarments have become a part of the attire of many for the rest of the world to see, but the reality is it shows that we don’t understand what beauty is or what it means to value ourselves as a woman.

A trend is what we make it. The Sisters in The Nation of Islam are rocking their garments confidently and setting the standard for what it means to dress and be modest.

“What a person is wearing can either bring their confidence down or boost it.”

– Sister Tanzania X

Sister Tanzania continues with reflections of her confidence while wearing her garment, “As for me, mine was at an all time high. I walked different, my smile was different, even my energy level changed. Prior to getting ready for the weekly Wednesday evening study group at The Final Call, it was like soon as I put my garment on my energy changed from blah to queen. I think that’s because our garments represent self respect, obedience, courage which is natural for us as women.

Tanzi & Christian
Sister Tanzania and Sister Christian

What’s the difference between being beautiful and naturally beautiful? 

“Being naturally beautiful to me means being yourself and blocking out what the outside world thinks of what you’re wearing and how you look. Beautiful means you may have to put in a bit more effort to achieve a certain look rather than when you’re natural it just flows”, says Sister Tanzania.

“Understand that our primary goal as women is to be beautiful. Yes, you read it right. Our primary goal in life is to be beautiful. Now you see why you are almost obsessed with your appearance, while men seem to care nothing about theirs… The desire to be beautiful is innate; it was programmed into our DNA by the First God Who Created Himself in and from the triple darkness of space.”

-Sister Dr. Ava Muhammad, Naturally Beautiful

Although being beautiful is a primary goal for the woman, we must not get carried away in the physical beauty, as much. When we work more on our mental and spiritual being our physical appearance will simultaneously enhance.

When the three wombs are properly healed and nurtured, we attract higher vibrations and will receive the best of compliments.

Sister Tanzania says, “While wearing my garment I received more respectful feedback rather than lustful. Overall my spirit is on a more positive level because I didn’t have to worry about attracting any unwanted attention.”

I noticed that I’m treated different when I’m in my garment. Sometimes I don’t like it that way because I deserve the same high respect that I get with or without the garment. I am human. I am a woman. I am still your Sister. I encourage everyone to respect women all over the world regardless of creed, class or color, and regardless of what she’s wearing.

One of the questions we receive: where can I get your outfit?

Garments are for registered Sisters in The Nation of Islam, referred to as M.G.T. & G.C.C. No other woman or organization has our garments, especially not the headpiece.

Sister Tanzania says, “Buying clothes from a store doesn’t compare to a garment. I whole heartedly  believe that when wearing our modest clothes, we represent God and also the talents of the person who made it. This isn’t regular clothing. My garments are tailor made and crafted by very talented women.”

Sister Tanzania supports the following Sisters who are also registered members in The Nation of Islam and who are passionate about modesty. They desire women to see the beauty in modest fashions and have turned that will into a brand and company for women all over the world.

 

Tanzi 2
Sister Tanzania wearing a garment purchased by Sister Shimah Muhammad

 

Sister Tanzania continues, “First and foremost all praises are due to Allah for (RE)conditioning the way I choose to dress. I also give thanks to the sisters for assisting me. My loving husband has also been a huge support with my transformation.

There are many reasons why women in the NOI wear modest clothing. We are always on a mission to represent God. Ask yourself would He be pleased with what you’re wearing? Being attracted to someone because of physical appearance will eventually fade away. We should strive to be drawn to people because of their knowledge and genuine love. Motivating black women to cover ourselves is one of the many responsibilities of wearing a garment.

I wear my headpiece proudly, it gives me a sense of protection that I’ve never felt before. When I wear my headpiece, I notice people think twice about acting or talking a certain way around me. I had a hard time covering my hair when I first came into the NOI because I always loved getting my hair done and showing it off but now I loveeeee wearing my headpiece and still slay.”

I love that Sister Tanzania is open about having a hard time covering her hair initially. Going back to the primary need we have to be beautiful: Initially it can seem as if covering our hair is taking away beauty, but now I see it as something that enhances my beauty. Now, that I understand my hair is an adornment (1 Peter 3:3), I’m happy to cover. I no longer have a need to show my hairstyles to everyone. I know that all of my beauty is for me and my future husband.

In comparison to a lot of first moments, why did you want to share this one with Facebook?

“I chose to share this moment with Facebook because I no longer cared about what anyone would say, who would judge, nor if I would lose friends or family. Publicly revealing my transition to the world was not only a step closer to Allah it was a step closer toward loving myself more.”

Sister Tanzania concludes with: “My life has drastically changed since I’ve came in to The Teachings of The Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Learning how to cook, sew, take care of my husband and rear my children properly just to name a few of our seven units has made such an impact on them, as well. It is through me that they are able to obtain a healthy and loving home. I’m forever grateful and honored to be an M.G.T.”